Archive for Ginna Nicolas

Springshare Is Going To ACRL — And It’s Going to R.O.C.K!

Do you know what Cleveland really needs to keep up its electrifying rock-star-of-a-city status? An influx of College and Research Librarians — and the people who love them! It’s happening, April 10-13, and Springshare jumped on that bandwagon and is excited to kick things off early with a LibGuides pre-conference workshop to open the show!

Springshare + Librarians in the CLE = a rousing good time, so come to Booth #639 to check out the killer set we have lined up for you or just say hello and talk to our band while we do our mic checks.

If you weren’t the radio show’s caller 106 and didn’t win free tickets…that’s ok. We know that like Aerosmith, you…don’t want to miss a thing. We’ve got you covered with Live Streams of some of these outstanding sessions. Just tune in to our Springshare Facebook Page at the scheduled local Cleveland time so you can catch the acts.

Please Welcome To The Stage…

Baylor University Libraries — Assessing Research Consultations: Surveying a ‘Captive’ Audience — Ellen Filgo

  • Wednesday, April 10 – 6:00pm to 6:20pm Streaming Live on Facebook

Baylor University Research and Engagement Librarians ramped up their research consultation program, using LibCal’s appointment scheduler as a convenient way for students to book appointments with the librarians. In 2017, they realized that we had an untapped opportunity for assessing the program, through LibCal’s automatic email system. They inserted a link to a LibWizard survey in that follow-up email with questions about the research consultation. This process was a very easy and low-maintenance way to perform assessment with what is virtually a captive audience.

 

 

Lehman College — Bloomberg and LibCal: A Match Made in Collaboration Heaven — Michelle Ehrenpreis

  • Thursday, April 11 – 10:00am to 10:20am Streaming Live on Facebook

Learn how LibCal was used to implement booking the newly installed Bloomberg Terminal in the Leonard Lief Library at Lehman College. Particulars include collaborating with business faculty to understand departmental needs, working with multiple departments to set up protocol, how the setup influences the student as user, harvesting relevant statistics, and future implications for implementation.

See the relevant guide.

 

 

University of Nebraska at Omaha — Women in STEM in Higher Education: An ALA Carnegie-Whitney Grant Project — Heidi Blackburn

  • Thursday, April 11 – 12:00pm to 12:20pm Streaming Live on Facebook

Imagine patrons trying to find sources on STEM-related topics such as biases women face, classroom experiences, learning communities, mentoring or work-life balance for assessment, best practices, or accreditation purposes. This information was not readily available in one location for easy access for reports, press releases, curriculum, grants, or other publications. In 2018, Heidi received an ALA Carnegie-Whitney grant for the creation of an online bibliography that provides easy access for librarians and researchers. With the help of a student research assistant, they created a LibGuide documenting and organizing over 1,100 citations regarding the status of women in STEM in higher education.

 

The Corning Museum of Glass — From Answer to Experience: LibAnswers FAQs Transformed — Mikki Smith

  • Thursday, April 11 – 1:00pm to 1:20pm Streaming Live on Facebook

In 2018, the Library’s Public Services Team formalized a plan to re-imagine the pool of several hundred static, redundant, and sometimes out-of-date published FAQs to function as a mobile-friendly, visually appealing introduction to Library and Museum resources. Revised FAQs highlight relevant digital content from across the organization where possible, including blog posts, images, digitized library resources, and videos from our YouTube channel, as well as a small number of print and archival resources in our collections that might be of interest. The library views FAQs as an opportunity to not only to provide high-quality reference service, but also to create a virtual experience for users that inspires them to explore further.

 

James Madison University — The Gap Between Student and Subject Guide: Findings from Usability Testing — Hillary Ostermiller

  • Thursday, April 11 – 1:30pm to 1:50pm Streaming Live on Facebook

Four liaison librarians from very different disciplines (including Biology, Business, Media Studies, Social Work, and Writing) conducted a series of usability tests in Spring 2018. They asked participants to complete a series of tasks using James Madison University subject guides, and all screen activity and voices were captured using Morae Recorder. The results were fascinating, enlightening, and immediately useful.

The research team is currently sharing practical implications from our findings with colleagues via a “Tip of the Week” email.

 

Marymount University — A Tale of Data: How Our Stats Have Improved 2 Years After Integrating LibGuides Into Our LMS — Bernadette Mirro

  • Thursday, April 11 – 2:00pm to 2:20pm Streaming Live on Facebook

 

An overview of two years’ worth of data that demonstrates the impact of integrating LibGuides into Canvas, a learning management system, that put the library’s resources at our students’ point of need. The statistics will reflect the impact of LTI integration on LibGuide visits, online reference chat service, streaming media usage, eBook usage and faculty awareness of resources. Learn how changing the way students access your resources can positively impact your library services!

 

Boise State University & Georgia College — Common Reader Remix: Librarians Leading Innovation — Mary Aagard & Jamie Addy

  • Thursday, April 11 – 2:30pm to 2:50pm Streaming Live on Facebook

This presentation describes the evolution of two campuses’ common reading programs from single item, book-based reads, to curated lists of essays. The essay selections are accessed via LibGuides and leverage library collections and open resource selections. LibGuides are used to track usage and organize materials that accompany the reading programs.

Check out the Boise State University Campus Read Program LibGuide

Check out the Georgia College Common Reading Program LibGuide

 

Wofford College –Library Memory is for Exhibits, Too — Melissa Clapp

  • Friday, April 12 – 11:00am to 11:20pm Streaming Live on Facebook

 

Library exhibits too frequently exist only ephemerally. Librarians can use Guides to give exhibits digital, interactive life, and a place in the library’s permanent memory. This presentation shows you how to maximize the effort put into exhibits by complementing the physical with digital space.

See the Sandor Teszler Library Gallery LibGuide

 

University of Guelph-Humber — LibWizard Tutorials for Training Student Workers — Sue Hunter

  • Friday, April 12 – 11:30am to 11:50pm Streaming Live on Facebook

 

At the University of Guelph-Humber student workers, known as Research Support Peers, staff a service desk to assist their peers in the research process. LibWizard tutorials were developed for training aids for these student workers. The tutorials include techniques for searching databases based on specific assignments and information on citation styles.

 

 

Kennesaw State University — Student-Centered Design: Creating LibGuides Students Actually Use — Amy Gratz BarkerAshley Hoffman

  • Friday, April 12 – 12:30am to 12:50pm Streaming Live on Facebook

Having trouble creating and maintaining research guides that students actually use? We were! Come learn how we addressed several years of low usage statistics and general dissatisfaction with our guides by creating a new blueprint based on student feedback. Our Research Guides Assessment Task Force conducted a months-long study using card sorting and usability testing methods to uncover students’ understanding of the research process and resources. We will share the results of our study, highlighting what students are really looking for, as well as tips for using these design research methods yourself!

Check out our Political Science LibGuide

 

Hobart and William Smith Colleges — Maintaining a Website Isn’t Only for the Coder at Heart — Emily Underwood

  • Friday, April 12 – 1:30am to 1:50pm Streaming Live on Facebook

 

What do you do when your institution’s systems librarian leaves and you inherit the responsibility for maintaining your library’s website and LibApps products? Run and hide? No! Despite a lack of coding knowledge, not only can you keep the website functioning, but you can also improve it.

You, too, can use LibGuides CMS to power your website all while learning to code on the fly!

 

 

Cleveland State University — Recasting Research Guidance: Using a Comprehensive Literature Review to Establish Best Practices for Developing LibGuides — Marsha Miles, Theresa Nawalaniec & Mandi Goodsett

  • Friday, April 12 – 2:00pm to 2:20pm Streaming Live on Facebook

Many academic librarians create and use LibGuides on a regular basis. As online tools, research guides should follow best practices for user experience, while also serving the needs of researchers on our campuses. Much has been published about LibGuide design in the last decade, and it can be hard to wade through the variety of literature, much of it gray literature. In keeping with evidence-based library and information practice, the researchers conducted an in-depth literature review, developed a set of literature-informed best practices for LibGuide design, and applied them to their own guides.

 

 

California University of Pennsylvania — Saving Time with Hidden Boxes and Reusable Content — Loring Prest

  • Friday, April 12 – 2:30pm to 2:50pm Streaming Live on Facebook

 

Learn how I use hidden boxes and reusable links to save time and standardize content on our LibGuides-based library website. These elements help manage the announcements that appear on the home page, display special messages in a top banner box that is enabled when needed, and provide standardized content for reuse by other LibGuide editors.

Check out the relevant LibGuide

 

Take In The House Band Sessions

LibGuides, LibGuides CMS & LibAuth

Creating LibGuides That Rock

Embedded Library with LibGuides CMS – LTI

Access Denied! Using LibAuth to restrict LibGuides CMS

Adding Dynamic Content to LibGuides with Gallery Boxes

LibCRM: Our Customer Relationship Management Tool Designed for Libraries

LibCRM: A CRM for Outreach & Liaison Librarians

The LibAnswers Platform

LibAnswers At Your Service

LibChat: Meet them where they are with Screensharing!

LibCal

LibCal: Appointments: Meeting Your Users

LibCal: Reservation Confirmed: Spaces and Equipment

LibInsight: Our Big Data Solution

LibInsight – COUNTER 5

LibStaffer:

Hire and Schedule Student Employees in One Product!

 

Here’s A Real News Feed. Springshare Brings You LibFoods!

LibFoods Market

Chew On This! Springshare Is Entering The SSaaS Business.

We are nourishing more than just your creativity these days and adding another “S” to our SaaS – Savory/Sweet as a Service! This is a natural extension of our value proposition to libraries. Springshare has been dedicated to being your one-stop shop for fresh, affordable solutions designed to help you provide the best possible service for your patrons. So, why are we still letting you stop to shop for food elsewhere?

No more! Now there’s LibFoods.

No Food in the Library…Think Again!

Enjoy an Edgar Allen Poe-boy

What was the first hurdle we had to jump? The established mindset of “Libraries + Food = No”. Ample (non)-scientific research shows that the best quality work is done when people are never more than 200 feet away from food.

Now, when you’re hungry you can check out the Library’s LibFoods pop-up store to enjoy librarian-curated, yummy, foods – e.g. a freshly made Edgar Allen Poe-boy followed by a perfectly portioned James and the Giant Peach Cobbler. Or, if you’re looking for something healthier and care about customizations, you can give LibFood’s Salad Makerspace a try. For the adventurer in you, try our Girl With The Dragon Tofu. Meatless Monday? Have the Artichoke Hearts of Darkness. No matter what you’re in the mood for, you’ll find just the thing in the LibFoods on-site store.

How Does LibFoods Work?

Springshare designed LibFoods so that it is familiar to you and your patrons via the two ways our clients prefer to acquire sustenance. First, you can customize and set up pop-up locations in your libraries on campus or various public branches. Patrons and staff will walk up to them and find LibGuides built on every section including our Creative Commons Fair Trade Coffee Stand, which serves our electronic signature LibRoast Blend, not to mention our killer Game of Scones baked fresh every morning.

The pop-up stores have special perks. You can, for instance, use our LibCalorie system to book an appointment with an on-site nutritionist. Meanwhile, LibWizard helps you instantly survey all the LibFoods shoppers to see which fish tacos in our Fresh Catch 22 they enjoyed. Results zip to your mobile phone and also display in monitors in your other linked stores in case someone else is curious. Want to ask LibFoods how many pounds of our Corned Beef in the Rye you need to feed your staff for the next meeting? They have someone dedicated to monitoring their LibChat queue to answer this and any other questions you have.

What if people are super busy working? Don’t worry, use our Charlotte’s Web browser to have LibFoods order delivered right to your office, study carrell, group study room, dorm or conference space, etc. via our partnership with InstaBookcart.

LibFoods integrates with your LibInsight system. You’ll find a dataset called LibInside that helps you track what your team devoured and what got left on the conference room table untouched. Generate a report of their delicious selections and order flawlessly!

We know there’s a lot to be said for furnishing food for thought. But the body celebrates when we provide food that turns into the energy you need…to push in all those chairs and tackle the worst of the paper jams! Your patrons will stay longer at the library, too because they have everything they need to stay fueled.

To learn more about LibFoods, check out our detailed website. Plus, be sure to read about our Rewards Program — LibFoods Choice, delivering all sorts of excellent benefits.

>> www.libfoods.tech <<

Arizona State Uses LibGuides for their March Mammal Madness

#2019MMM — Are You Playing?

If you’re on Twitter, even a little, you’ve probably seen someone enthusiastically cheering for a Bengal Tiger or proclaiming she’s Team Sea Lion, even pumped about a Bearcat for the win. You heard correctly, pumped.

It’s possible that at no other time of the year will you read so many academics use that word than during Arizona State University’s March Mammal Madness — a tournament that features mammals encountering other mammals in the wild and seeing who’d win.

In 2013, Dr. Katie Hinde, who as an Associate Professor at ASU investigates the food, medicine, and signal of mother’s milk, founded MMM — whose name is a play off of the NCAA March Madness Basketball tournament. Each year the madness spreads with more contributors, participants, and unabashed fans! You’ll find detailed instructions on how to play laid out in a special LibGuide they’ve built. The action is happening right now as they are currently mid-tournament with the Sweet Sixteen.

Using LibGuides to Organize the Madness.

March Mammal Madness is an educational opportunity to learn all about our planet’s species woven with a bracket and served as a thrilling competitive experience. Professors, scientists, researchers, students and classrooms of children from all over the world look forward to and passionately play MMM — and they play to win.

They might have started out making their picks based on mammals whose names they knew, like the Rock Wallaby or Beaver. But, after seeing how the encounters went down in the incredible narrations done by the tournament contributors, most realized it was important to do the research on the Bharal and Rakali!

Anali Perry, the Scholarly Communication Librarian at ASU, recalled that before using LibGuides, this tournament was all managed in Dr. Hinde’s blog. In 2017, as the tournament grew year over year, not just in popularity but in moving parts, Anali suggested they build a special guide for the tournament information in their LibGuides CMS system.

Anali said, “I spend a lot of time advocating for increased access to scholarly research. I think MMM is a fantastic example of how excited people of all ages can get about science and scholarship! It’s important to me to contribute to MMM each year because I can help point people to free and open sources of good information, as well as look for open access versions of articles cited.”

Anali said it wasn’t easy for people to find the information they needed on the blog so they built a LibGuide that wasn’t aimed toward the ASU community but was, rather, for participants all over the world.

  • In 2017, the LibGuide had 18,000 views over the 6-week tournament period.
  • 2018 saw 89,000 views over that same 6 weeks.
  • In 2019, the day the tournament dropped, the LibGuide had 100,000 views and is currently at 257,692 views at the midpoint.

 

The guide offers everything from an FAQ to the downloadable bracket. It features animal background information with free and open resources, resources for K-12, and academic information resources.  There are videos, mammal art, links to recaps and news. They even archive the MMM tournament back to its beginning and give information on ASUs researchers and current research topics.

The Power of a Great Idea

When people love what they’re working on, it shows and in the case of March Mammal Madness — it advances, running through the jungles, swimming against the currents, swinging to capture the imagination of mammal lovers everywhere.

It’s not just the players who are hooked.

Lara Durgavich, Lecturer at Tufts University recalls, “One of the saltiest battle outcomes I can remember was in 2018 when I narrated a battle between the common octopus and the green anaconda. Ironically, it ended poorly for the octopus precisely because the river where the battle took place wasn’t salty enough. Fans were not happy to see the octopus defeated by osmosis.”

MMM is fun and great for science. Mauna Dasari, PhD Candidate at the University of Notre Dame said, “In addition to all the fans (and associated trash talk), I really love how MMM is so often a marriage of old science with new communication. Papers (and whole PhD theses) documenting everyday behaviors get pulled from the annals of science and presented to the public in this completely new platform and style. In academia, we publish these very specific papers that can be hard to generate a lot of public interest in at the time (let alone 20 years later) but MMM bridges the gap beautifully.”

Finally, March Mammal Madness is rather brilliantly tailored to be interesting to children who often ask who would win in a fight between Superman and Batman? Marc Kissel, Visiting Assistant Professor at Appalachian State University said, “It is hard to imagine the scope of this project. Seeing tweets from kids who stayed up late to watch the battles and classrooms sharing their brackets is incredible. I’m honored to be a part of this.”

So, don’t be afraid of starting something outlandish! Educating people should be a bold adventure.

We would like to note that we did have a particular interest in this year’s round one battle between the Springhare (close enough) and the Jackrabbit. Yay, Springhare! Only to find ourselves crestfallen at the round two loss to the Bengal Tiger. Alas!

Springshare Client Stories: Usage Examples From Your Peers

It’s Great To Have An Idea. It’s Even Better To Have Examples.

Making improvements is the name of the game. You’ve listened to the feedback on the services you offer… and have made a point to get started on providing those that you don’t. The priority is making sure your library is as useful to your patrons as possible. There have been meetings and plans. The projects are assigned. You have a vision for what you can do with the solutions you own. But, it’s helpful and practical to see what other libraries are doing. Reading about how your peers have come up with additional uses or found innovative ways to use features — this exchange is invaluable as you tailor your library to meet patron needs.

Springshare understands how beneficial it is for our clients to see how other libraries solve problems, implement new services and, what’s more — learn how people have responded to the work they’re doing. We’ve had the Springshare Lounge since the very beginning. We share client usage examples in this blog. Plus, we have dedicated a section of the Springshare Buzz site to in-depth Client Stories. Examples are essential in life. If you were tiling your bathroom for the first time, you’d probably watch a video. If you were bungee jumping, you’d want someone else to go first!

Get In The Mix.

The Client Stories in the Buzz Site feature many types of libraries. You’ll find stories about Academic, Public, Government, Hospital and, soon, we’ll feature a School library. They all highlight ways your peers are using Springshare tools.

Sometimes, we explore a singular accomplishment. For instance, the story on Penn State University covers how they have a library presence across 30,000 online courses using the LTI integration tool in LibGuides CMS. Other times, you’ll discover a story that shares how a library, like the Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Public Library, uses the Springshare Suite of tools.

Don’t box yourself in. Get in there are read about how all kinds of librarians are working toward providing outstanding service.

Great Minds Prioritize Alike.

Client Stories align with your current and future projects because they’re all about your peers. Don’t be surprised to see segments that look a lot like your to-do lists or your recent meeting agenda talking points. Great librarians. Great minds. Great community.

Are you thinking about using the LibGuides Blogging tool for a newsletter?

  • In the VDOT Research Library Client Story, it says, “For years, the Associate Director Ken Winter and the librarians wanted to have a weekly E-Newsletter. Their motivation was to use the LibGuides CMS blog feature to share new resources and publicize cool guides they had built, write about general library information and highlight research news.”

Have you been considering using the LibAnswers Platform but would love to hear how it’s working for libraries?

  • The story on City, University of London quotes Lucy Clifford, the Library Systems Manager/Analyst/Programmer who says, “We’ve had great feedback from our users about the booking system and chat services in particular. We’re involved in an externally scrutinised customer service award scheme (the WOW! Awards) and a substantial number of the nominations received by library staff for these have resulted from LibChat enquiries.”

Wondering if you’re using LibWizard to its full potential?

  • The Southern New Hampshire University story shares an innovative use for LibWizard. Their reference librarian built a simple LibWizard Reference S.O.S. form, which they’ve embedded in the LibAnswers Admin Alert Box. Jennifer explains that, “We needed some way for them to really quickly call for help because an email takes too long and a phone call also. Basically, as long as they have the dashboard up, with 2 clicks they can get help. It will email all the reference librarians at once and just asks for help.”

There’s a wealth of knowledge and experience out there. Librarians are innovators with some of the same goals as you and, often, the same challenges. It’s constructive and efficient to learn how some addressed their dilemmas.

Hot Off The Presses!

The newest Client Story was just published this week. Check out the work being done by the team at Geisinger Health. Library Director, Tricia Ulmer discusses their journey with Springshare tools, the problems they were trying to solve and illuminates us on why “…medical libraries are the place to be.”

Springshare loves learning about the excellent ideas our clients have imagined and implemented using our tools, so what else would we do but listen and praise and share them with you! Happy reading.

 

Get Creative. Let Your LibGuides Imagination Run Wild.

LibGuides Is Your Efficient & Effective Multi-Tool.

While the cake pop maker you got as a gift sits in your pantry with many other one-purpose small appliances, you probably think about regifting it at least four times a year. You already know that LibGuides can help you build subject guides, course-specific guides, guides you use to outline your orientation sessions and — for public libraries — guides for everything from Taxes to Genealogy to Job Searching and beyond.

LibGuides is so flexible because we didn’t design it to do those things. We designed it to communicate. LibGuides can also be your megaphone, your bulletin board, your invitation, and your checklist. It can be your newsletter, your blog, your virtual book club… you see where we’re going with this. It can be your go-to way of starting any conversation with your multiple audiences and — while you’re at it — it is a scrapbook of all the cool things you’re doing and sharing! If you have LibGuides CMS, it can be your intranet, your sandbox and more! Check out some really great ways people are using LibGuides to say — anything.

Keep Everyone In The Loop.

LibGuides are easy to build and, just as important, they’re easy to keep updated. They’re a perfect fit for building guides that are important to everyone. The University of South Carolina Upstate Library turned to LibGuides to keep everyone updated on the Library renovations. They designed a visually striking image and put it in the top box that spans the columns. They included images and have a tabbed box they’re using as a monthly blog to detail progress and share timelines. They’ve even got a top-level tab that contains Conceptual Drawings and Plans. It’s a stellar example of keeping their community engaged and in the loop.

 

Conferences, Vendor Days, Annual Meetings and Events. Check!

Organizing a big event takes creativity, organization, attention to detail… and then you have to market it and make sure your audience has all the pertinent details. If you’re a frequent attendee, you know how helpful a good event site can be. The West Virginia University Law Library built a guide for the SEAALL Annual Meeting. It features side-navigation tabs that share information about

  • Registration
  • The Schedule
  • Accommodations
  • Networking activities and more.

The best part? Since they also have LibWizard, if they wanted to get feedback, they could add a survey to the guide and ask attendees to fill it out after the event.

Publicize a Contest.

Bulletin boards are great… if you’re looking for a drummer. But if you need to share more information, you should head to LibGuides. The B.D. Owens Library at Northwest Missouri State University is asking for submissions of a paper or project for their Undergraduate Library Research Awards. They have conveyed the deadline, listed the prizes, shared the date and time for the ceremony. Plus, they utilized the tabs to define the eligibility, the criteria and even have a section noting previous winners. LibGuides is designed with promotion in mind. During the publication stage, they can share this guide via Twitter and Facebook. Plus, friendly URLs are great for sharing the link. When you want to get the word out — but there are definitely more than two words, (i.e. “roommate needed!”) we’ve got you covered.

Foster A Sense of Community with a Book Club.

Libraries are using the Blogging feature in LibGuides to announce exciting additions to the collection, to introduce a new member of the team, to share a new service being offered, and — in the case of Boston Children’s Hospital — to post information about their Book Group. People can subscribe to the blog. They can view recent posts and even check out the archive. Engagement is encouraged with integrated commenting. Behind the scenes, the bloggers can manage subscribers, create a blog widget and, to really up the broadcast game, they can easily share a published blog on social media.

Possible Future Projects

If you want to nurture your creativity in 2019, we’re here to encourage more limitless thinking. We’ve got excellent videos on-hand for you to peruse and new live sessions to keep you discovering (sign-up to get Training email alerts!).

ALA Mid-Winter, Coffees & Books… Springshare is Seattle Bound!

How excited are we?! Any day of the year, Seattle is a dream destination. It has a lovely skyline, is home to bookstore after bookstore filled with new, used & collectible books gathered in super charming shops. Coffee is at the top of the food pyramid. All that spells, let’s do this. But, add to that — an invasion of Librarians upon the city, January 25-29, and our Springys will wake up extra early to fight you for the window seat!

While you’re at ALA Mid-Winter, come see us in Booth #1004. Although we won’t be throwing any giant fresh fish at you, you can catch our incredible presentation lineup!

For those of you who are home minding the library. Stay tuned! We’ll be live streaming some of these amazing sessions. Head over to our Springshare Facebook Page at the scheduled local Seattle time and you’ll be right there with us. You can even ask questions in the comments area. We’ll make sure the speaker sees them so you can get answers.

Training Tidbits

LibStaffer Workflows Forms: handle all your job applications, hiring, and scheduling in one tool!

LibChat: “Let me show you how…” Screensharing in Real Time

Payment Required: Using the Billing and Payments with LibCal for Events & Spaces

LibCRM: A CRM for Outreach & Liaison Librarians

Access Denied! Using LibAuth to restrict LibGuides CMS

Best Practices for Images in LibGuides

LibGuides Gallery Boxes

Guest Presentations

Troy University – The Library Has That?: Using LibGuides to Promote Library Services.

  • Saturday – 10:00am to 10:15am Streaming Live on Facebook

The Troy University Librarians provide services to students, staff, and faculty at four Alabama campuses and around the world. LibGuides were used to provide a centralized point of reference to answer recurring questions. Join Elizabeth Dill, Kelly Wilson and Rachel Hooper as they discuss these guides and how they have impacted their librarians and services to their patrons.

East Central University: Strength-Share: How the Linscheid Library Used Springshare’s Discussion Board for Librarian Team-building

  • Sunday – 10:00am to 10:15am Streaming Live on Facebook

The librarians at East Central University underwent a project in 2018 to improve employee communication and relationships. Join Patrick Baumann to learn about the project origins and more. Attendees can expect to take away creative ways to use Springshare products to improve their work environment.

Texas Tech University: Using LibGuides Across Subjects: A Science Librarian Perspective

  • Sunday – 12:30pm to 12:45pm Streaming Live on Facebook

Jessica Simpson will discuss how she’s customized guides to meet the needs of students across disciplines. Attendees can expect to take away great tips for making their guides more useful.

Fort Vancouver Regional Library: LibAnswers Queues and FAQs in a Public Library Setting

  • Monday – 11:00am to 11:15am Streaming Live on Facebook

While LibAnswers can be used to answer patron questions, the sky is really the limit in how you use it to manage patron communication. Learn how Fort Vancouver Regional Library customized queues for Reading Suggestions, Proctoring, and Technology Assistance services, and see how they use FAQs to proactively address trends in patron questions.

 

Always Stay Tuned: Springshare Has Lots For You To Love.

Fall Back — In Love With Learning More!

For those of you who changed your clocks, what will you do with your extra hour? As the calendar year comes to a close, one might think that it’s time to wind things down.

However, here at Springshare, we do no such thing. For a lot of libraries, this time of year actually poses an opportunity. Perhaps you finally have some time to evaluate current processes, look into new solutions and/or catch up on the latest feature updates to the Springy tools you’ve already got.

So, instead of slowing down, we’re just as ramped up as ever to help you take advantage of this time.

Springy Live Sessions Are Always A Best Bet.

Our classic free training sessions are a staple around here as they are a delightful mix of thorough and lively — mostly because our trainers love interacting with clients and our clients ask excellent questions that benefit everyone in attendance. Don’t miss these upcoming sessions. For a complete list of what’s to come, please check the training calendar.

New to the lineup is the Brunch & Learn series. These are live sessions centered around specific topics. Often they highlight ways that people are using our tools. We have one more scheduled for this year. Make sure to catch it. But, you can also have fun watching the recordings of some of our recent installments!

For those who have a little time and want to learn a little more, we recently introduced Training Tidbits. If you have 15 minutes and want to walk away after them just stunned by how much you could learn in so little time, then keep an eye out for these quick sessions. Be sure to catch these upcoming LIVE sessions.

A New Watchlist to Add to Your Rotation.

If you read our most recent SpringyNews edition, you probably saw that we added a new section called the Watchlist. It’s our version of staff recommendations but it’s focused on our recorded webinars, presentations from clients at conferences, SpringyCamp sessions, and more. In these next few weeks, go ahead and hunker down with some of these cherry-picked videos. It’s certainly a fun way to gather tips and tricks.

Updates on the Horizon.

The developers here at Springshare are as busy as ever working on bringing to life new features and enhancements to make sure Springy solutions are as up-to-date as possible with the current needs — and, sometimes, we even get a step or two ahead. To always keep up with the tech, make sure to read our Blog. Plus, you’ll find a section of the newsletter devoted to the soon-to-be-released updates. Read up on what’s in store, now.

Don’t want to miss a thing?

Did you see the latest Client Story in our Buzz Site on the Boston Public Library? Perhaps you haven’t. Maybe the new Brunch & Learn sessions and the latest SpringyNews newsletter and the Client Stories are all news to you as you. If you don’t want to miss any of the fun, informative, classic or new content we are actively putting together for you — then make sure you opt-in to the good times.

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Beyond The Library: LibCal Usage

Lately, we’ve been discovering more and more examples of non-library folks showing an interest and later purchasing LibCal for use by their teams and the customers they serve. While it may have started in the libraries, it’s clear that many are catching on to the fact that LibCal — with its awesome features and, yet, simple interface — works beautifully in so many different settings.

As Heather Westerlund, IT Manager at Walden University Libraries, stated in an in-depth interview on how Springy Tools have expanded beyond the Walden Uni. Libraries,

Just because it has the word ‘Lib’ in it, doesn’t mean that only the Library can use it!

If you need calendars, appointments, have spaces, perhaps equipment and want to share your hours, LibCal can work for you, too — no matter what it says on your office door.

The essential LibCal.

LibCal is made up of 4 components with an optional 5th that is an add-on module. They work together to form a complete integrated calendaring solution that is flexible enough to be used beyond the library.

It’s cloud-based, mobile-first, affordable, boasts in-depth statistics to help you make data-driven decisions and comes with Springshare’s free training and support.

Libraries have been recommending more than books.

In some institutions, LibCal use is really spreading. Emory University in Atlanta now has 6 LibCal systems, 4 of which are being used outside the library in offices like the Scholarly Communications Office, Tutoring, Student Digital Life, and Campus and Community Relations. There are a number of excellent examples of other departments on academic campuses who are successfully using LibCal for their needs.

 

At Florida Atlantic University, the Office of Instructional Technologies has a LibCal system that they use for upcoming events, room booking and appointment scheduling.

Recently the Human Resources office at FAU also purchased a LibCal system.

 

 

 

 

 


Arizona State University has a Digital Creative Studio that is using LibCal Calendars for events.

They use the Equipment Booking Add-on Module for reserving computer workstations, and the Spaces booking for reserving event space and video studios.

Appointment Scheduling: It should be nice (and easy) to meet you.

LibCal saves you the troublesome back and forth of emails where you keep trying to nail down a time that works for both parties.

Add your availability, create a custom form for people to fill out, and even set up different types of appointments that have appropriate durations.

While students do meet with librarians, imagine all the other departments on campus that have personnel that also meet with students or faculty, etc.. The Southern Methodist University Advisory Group uses LibCal to allow people to schedule appointments with

  • Academic Counseling
  • Academic Services
  • Pre-Health Advising
  • Student Athlete Academic Services
  • Simmons Student Academic Advising
  • the University Advising Center
  • and the Student Transfer Admission department

Booking spaces, rooms and more!

We’ve heard just about everything when it comes to how people are handling the booking of spaces and rooms. With all the conference rooms and performance spaces, computer labs, classrooms, auditoriums, etc. on site, having a simple way to make them available and manage them is in order. The Spaces component is one of the main draws to LibCal. People are really creative in how they use it — because it’s flexible enough to suit many needs.

The Oklahoma State School of Business is using LibCal Spaces for their breakout rooms.

 

An innovative use comes to us from the Thompson Rivers University Sustainability Department which is using it to allow people to book cars as a way of car sharing.

Equip yourself with tools for success.

Maker spaces are popping up all over. We’ve seen a rise in interest from them in recent years and they use LibCal to highlight workshops and classes. They let people book appointments with artists and experts and techs. They use the Equipment Booking Add-on Module to make their devices, machinery, tools, and equipment available. It’s proving to be a great pairing.

The Innevation Center at the University of Nevada, Reno is doing awesome things with LibCal. Here’s the Equipment Module in action there.

 

So, here’s to the same energy that prompts a person to tell another about a really great book or movie or restaurant. Word of mouth is powerful, even in the tech world — but only if the solutions really work. LibCal is an excellent tool that helps you seamlessly allow your students, faculty, staff, and patrons to take advantage of the services, classes, workshops you offer, to meet with you, to reserve your spaces and equipment — to engage with you. And, if they are doing that — you’ll all be a wild success.

LibGuides CMS: Getting The Most From Groups Functionality

There are many excellent reasons why people choose (or upgrade to) LibGuides CMS. It has access controls, the LTI integration tool, comes with LibWizard Lite and so much more. However, the way the system allows you to create separate customizable groups is, to this day, one of the most popular draws.

LibGuides is so easy to use that our clients began to start imagining other ways they could use it. They’ve taken advantage of the flexibility and used it for their websites. Sometimes departments within the library, like Special Collections or Reference, would ask their system admins if they could build guides but they wanted to have their own banner. LibGuides CMS makes this possible along with a variety of other thoughtful uses.

Build an Intranet the Team Will Really Use.

Using LibGuides CMS for your Intranet platform makes sense on so many levels. Why divert them to, yet, another interface? The staff already knows how to build LibGuides. Now, they can build guides on Professional Development Days and on Vacation and Sick Day Policies. Imagine encouraging the team to build not just a profile box but a whole guide that includes more than what you’d see on a resume. It could include hobbies, photos of favorite trips, books on their must-read lists, work playlists and more. Your intranet would connect people and help them truly get to know one another. Plus, you could embed LibCal calendars to keep everyone on the same page and LibAnswers FAQs to help with onboarding new hires. You could embed LibWizard forms or surveys to get team feedback on new projects up for consideration. Your Intranet group could be a real hang out spot.

Everyone Loves to Play in a Sandbox.

If you’ve been thinking about updating your look and feel but you are not sure if your ideas are executable or if it will look too sparse or, conversely, too crowded, etc., then you’re probably wishing you had a staging area to play around in and test. With LibGuides CMS, you can create a sandbox group. Then using access controls, you can lock it down with password protection or IP address restriction. You can build and modify and adjust as you wish without disrupting the guides your patrons are currently using.

Organize Your Guides in a New Way.

Some clients are using the groups functionality in LibGuides CMS to make finding what you need more efficient and clear-cut. They have a group for Subject guides and another group for Course guides and they can keep going. You could put all the General Library Information guides in a group and/or build a group for Events and Instruction. On the public-facing side, it would be an organized person’s dream.

It’s Not Old, It’s Archived.

We’re hearing from more and more libraries that a digital archive solution is something that’s becoming a real priority. The University of Oklahoma’s Jason Henderson presented Digital Archives on a Dime at our virtual conference, SpringyCamp, regarding his experience building, hosting and publishing a digital archive using Internet Archive and the LibGuides CMS groups functionality. He emphasized that he was mindful of their budget, wanted it to be easy to use for their patrons, and that it was critical for the team that it be easy to set up and maintain.

Don’t Be Afraid to Branch Out.

Public libraries make immensely helpful LibGuides on taxes and genealogy and National Poetry Month. However, what public libraries do best is hone in on the needs of the people they serve and those needs are often particular to the branches. LibGuides CMS allows you to make individual groups for each branch. They can have their own banner, header, footer and they can have their own looks and feels or they can have a consistent look that threads them together. Best of all, if a branch has a large senior population or, perhaps, another branch has a lot of veterans or young families, the librarians can build guides in the confines of their own group to cater to them.

Speak the Same Language.

LibGuides CMS allows groups to have a fair amount of independence. They can have their own URLs and home pages with a choice of navigation layout. What’s more, they can be customized in different languages, too! We have clients that, legally, must provide their guides in both French and English, for instance. LibGuides CMS works for them because they can build a group for each language and then they can add a link to the other in case a user wants to switch from the English to the French. Et voila! Let your imagination drive for a stretch and make a targeted list of all the ways — internal and public-facing — you can envision using LibGuides CMS groups at your library. Nothing else will be so easy…or end up looking so good.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Essential LibGuides and Ones You Didn’t Know You Needed

LibGuides icon

For Academic libraries, this time of year is exciting as the physical and virtual campuses are brimming with students and faculty. Your Library Orientations are in full swing. Your Social Media efforts are kicked into high gear as you promote your services. You’ve got to remind everyone that you’re there! As you do this, it’s a good time to have a look at your LibGuides.

If you’ve had LibGuides for a while now, it’s highly likely you have the essential guides built and they’re ready for your users. But there’s a chance that even your library could add some guides to your “to-build” list when you see what some other institutions are showcasing.

What Are Some Essential LibGuides?

Springshare has a bird’s eye view of the guides that exist in the community and we have consistently seen some staple topics.

It’s always a great idea to have guides addressing:

 

As you see these topics, they probably make absolute sense to you. If you are new to LibGuides, remember we have free training and free support, if you have questions. Plus, you have access to the LibGuides community where you can see examples of such guides.

Put Your Best Guide Forward.

If you have these guides already built, why not check the stats on them? It’s a great way to keep the guides fresh and exciting. What should you be looking for?

  • Which guides are most popular? Perhaps your patrons like the way it flows/looks. Make future guides with this in mind.
  • During which time of year are they visiting the guides? Maybe the timing coincides with orientation, exams, large projects or your instruction sessions with classes.
  • Are there books or links or any content that show a lot of clicks? Perhaps they’re being recommended or they have good descriptions, etc.
  • Are there content items that have little or no clicks? Could these benefit from different placement on the page or better descriptions? Or, maybe it’s a good idea to replace them with new items that you have because people aren’t interested in them.

It’s a perfect time of year for refreshing your LibGuides with new resources you may have acquired since you first built them or to hone what’s there based on what you glean from the historical data.

Must-Have Guides That May Surprise You.

So what kind of content is out there that you may not have thought to make, yet? Here are some examples that might inspire you and your team.

You can build guides focused on serving specific subsets like International Students or Graduate Students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many libraries are creating LibGuides for Professional Development on topics like integrating intersectionality into library instruction and programming or on how to make PowerPoint presentions more captivating.

Focusing on faculty, there are guides on keeping your research current and on boosting your scholarly impact. Another excellent idea for internal purposes is to use LibGuides to provide a place to recognize each other.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you’re building LibGuides for your students, think about specific resources that are available to them like the Student Learning Center or Archives and Special Collections and let LibGuides be the vehicle you use to introduce them to what they can find there.

 

 

Finally, put yourself in their shoes. What are the skills they’re trying to advance? What are the challenges they’re gearing up to face? Check out these examples on using images and prepping for exams. You can build LibGuides on any subject. Be creative, devise a way for your students and faculty to submit suggestions or requests — and have fun!