Archive for Community

ALA-Midwinter Guest Presentation Recordings Now Available

Guest Presentation Recordings Available on FacebookFeeling #alaleftbehind? In case you missed our awesome line-up of guest speakers at the ALA-Midwinter Conference in Atlanta, we have the recordings available on our Facebook page!

And while you’re there, like our Facebook page to have our posts display in your Facebook Feed. This way, you won’t miss out any product update announcements, video presentations, and more.

These 15-min guest presentations by Springshare users will get you thinking about all the new and interesting ways you can use your Springshare tools.

Perhaps you’ll want to setup a ‘Ghosts in the Library’ LibGuide like SUNY New Paltz or use LibGuides CMS as a course management system like the University of Florida. Or take a page from Goldey-Beacom College and Cleveland State University and consider using LibGuides and LibWizard as on-boarding tools for new hires.

So take a minute (or two or three) and learn from your fellow colleagues on the endless possibilities of Springy tools.

Forget about being #alaleftbehind – it’s time to get #springyinspired!

Lydia Willoughby

Lydia Willoughby

SUNY New Paltz: Ghosts in the Library

Using LibGuides v2 as a platform for content delivery, student voting and resource sharing, students in an introductory English Composition class play a learning game. In the game, teams of students must use library tools to research information about a ghost whose legacy has been underrepresented in the historic record.

cindi craig

Cindi Craig

University of Florida: Using LibGuides for Portfolio Management

When I taught a section of a small, in-person information skills course, I used LibGuides as a course management system. I also had each student create a personal LibGuide and update it with library resources on a chosen topic throughout the course.

Denise Gergetz

Denise Gergetz

Milwaukee School of Engineering: Managing & Scheduling Molecular Models

Download PowerPoint Slides

The Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) Model Lending Library has a unique collection of physical models and materials designed to assist in molecular learning. The library makes these models available for short-term loan, using the LibCal Equipment Booking Module.

Karoline Manny

Karoline Manny

Midway University: Using LibGuides & LibAnswers for Communication and Collaboration

Download PowerPoint Slides

The Center@Midway for Teaching Excellence and Innovation promotes ongoing academic program enhancement and faculty development. The Center quickly found itself in need of an efficient way to communicate with faculty and students regarding their immediate and future needs. We turned to LibGuides and LibAnswers.

Monica Rysavy

Monica Rysavy

Russell Michalak

Russell Michalak

Goldey-Beacom College: Onboarding with LibGuides

Download Presentation PDF

These onboarding tutorials comprise the required onboarding components for student workers, paraprofessionals, and professional library staff on library services topics such as cataloging procedures, circulation procedures, serials procedures, WorkFlows (Library Management System) procedures, opening/closing duties, in addition to other library policies and procedures.

Mandi Goodsett

Mandi Goodsett

Cleveland State University: Building Online Workshops with LibGuides & LibWizard

By embedding outside tools like Office Mix, Google Forms, and Adobe Captivate into a LibGuide, I created gradable tests and quizzes, tutorials, and other interactive materials, all of which are accompanied by digital badges. I  used LibWizard and a tool called TubeChop to add assessment to YouTube videos and make them more engaging.

Alyssa Martin

Alyssa Martin

Troy University: Using LibGuides to Promote Library Programming Grants

Download PowerPoint Slides

Use LibGuides to promote your library programming grants! Troy University Libraries used LibGuides to promote their 2016 Banned Books Week grant activities and we have also created a LibGuide to promote our NEA Big Read events.

Raising the Heat in Hotlanta!

booth 1056Springshare’s heading to the ALA-Midwinter Annual Conference in Atlanta, January 20 – 23. And, we’ve got a totally rocking schedule of flash presentations, coloring time, team Libe vs. Lib buttons, and more. Plus, you won’t want to miss out on seeing how your fellow librarians use Springshare tools at Booth 1056.

Flash Presentations

Guest Presentations

We have an extraordinary lineup of 8 guest presenters doing 7 separate flash presentations. Don’t miss out on seeing how they’re using Springshare tools to provide stellar service.

Friday, Jan 20: View Entire Day’s Schedule

Lydia Willoughby

Lydia Willoughby

SUNY New Paltz: Ghosts in the Library

5:45pm – 6:00pm

Using LibGuides v2 as a platform for content delivery, student voting and resource sharing, students in an introductory English Composition class play a learning game. In the game, teams of students must use library tools to research information about a ghost whose legacy has been underrepresented in the historic record.

cindi craig

Cindi Craig

University of Florida: Using LibGuides for Portfolio Management

6:00pm – 6:15pm

When I taught a section of a small, in-person information skills course, I used LibGuides as a course management system. I also had each student create a personal LibGuide and update it with library resources on a chosen topic throughout the course.


Saturday, Jan 21: View Entire Day’s Schedule

Denise Gergetz

Denise Gergetz

Milwaukee School of Engineering: Managing & Scheduling Molecular Models

10:00am – 10:15am

The Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) Model Lending Library has a unique collection of physical models and materials designed to assist in molecular learning. The library makes these models available for short-term loan, using the LibCal Equipment Booking Module.

Karoline Manny

Karoline Manny

Midway University: Using LibGuides & LibAnswers for Communication and Collaboration

1:00pm – 1:15pm

The Center@Midway for Teaching Excellence and Innovation promotes ongoing academic program enhancement and faculty development. The Center quickly found itself in need of an efficient way to communicate with faculty and students regarding their immediate and future needs. We turned to LibGuides and LibAnswers.

Monica Rysavy

Monica Rysavy

Russell Michalak

Russell Michalak

Goldey-Beacom College: Onboarding with LibGuides

2:30pm – 2:45pm

These onboarding tutorials comprise the required onboarding components for student workers, paraprofessionals, and professional library staff on library services topics such as cataloging procedures, circulation procedures, serials procedures, WorkFlows (Library Management System) procedures, opening/closing duties, in addition to other library policies and procedures.


Sunday, Jan 22: View Entire Day’s Schedule

Mandi Goodsett

Mandi Goodsett

Cleveland State University: Building Online Workshops with LibGuides & LibWizard

1:00pm – 1:15pm

By embedding outside tools like Office Mix, Google Forms, and Adobe Captivate into a LibGuide, I created gradable tests and quizzes, tutorials, and other interactive materials, all of which are accompanied by digital badges. I  used LibWizard and a tool called TubeChop to add assessment to YouTube videos and make them more engaging.

Alyssa Martin

Alyssa Martin

Troy University: Using LibGuides to Promote Library Programming Grants

2:00pm – 2:15pm

Use LibGuides to promote your library programming grants! Troy University Libraries used LibGuides to promote their 2016 Banned Books Week grant activities and we have also created a LibGuide to promote our NEA Big Read events.

Dugan Library Saw Library Usage Increase with Introduction of LibGuides

Jeanette Parker

Jeanette Parker, Assistant Librarian

Steve Hamersky

Steve Hamersky, Library Director

During the Fall of 2015, Newman University’s Dugan Library introduced LibGuides to their community and since then, they’ve seen some amazing jumps in library usage.

Springshare sat down, virtually speaking, with Steve Hamersky (Director) and Jeanette Parker (Assistant Librarian) to get the full details.

When you say you saw a “jump in library usage” – what does that entail?

  • Door count is up from previous years by 10%
  • Individual consults/long reference exchanges are up by 100% from just one year ago
  • Number of students reached in programs, classes, workshops is up 48% from one year ago
  • Number of instruction sessions/classes/programs is up 50%
  • ILL requests are up 41% – “we feel this is due to them looking closer and searching better, not settling for just full text.”
  • Dugan Library

    Dugan Library

    Database Usage:

    • Sessions increased by 44%
    • Searches are up 40%
    • Full text downloads increased by 18%
    • Abstract views are up 25%
  • LibGuides Statistics since July 1, 2016:
    • Course Guides: 4,226 Views
    • Subject Guides: 5,283 Views
    • Other/Misc Guide: 299 Views

These results are great! Can you tell us, why did you come on board with LibGuides and what kind of guides are you building?

In 2014, the library was issued a mandate to get more involved on campus. Jeanette and Steve worked together and discovered that there wasn’t a program to equip students in research. Furthermore, the library website wasn’t structured to aid students in finding resources for assignments and the Database A-Z list was overwhelming.

Hence LibGuides!

Jeanette began by creating subject guides.

We really wanted something that would focus on a particular discipline and guide students to successfully locate good quality resources and not be using Google to search, which seems their default. We also noticed that many students were overwhelmed with the database options available, so this created a kind of barrier for their searching, they weren’t sure where to start, couldn’t remember what we’d told them, etc. So we wanted to create something that would eliminate the guesswork enabling them to focus on searching and evaluating sources.

Once the Subject Guides were complete, it was time for Steve and Jeanette to look for a professor willing to collaborate on a course-specific LibGuide. To visually differentiate course guides from subject guides, Jeanette uses tabbed navigation for subject LibGuides and side navigation for course LibGuides.

“The first course guide was definitely an experiment, trying to get the right balance of what we felt was important for students and including the elements that instructors needed.  During the spring semester (2016) we created 5 different course guides and introduced them in classes. We strongly encourage a library visit to introduce the students to the guide and the majority of faculty are on board with this.

How did you get faculty on board with building course-specific LibGuides?

Steve and Jeanette have created a pattern of visiting with faculty and presenting on the library’s “new” tools and information.

We spend about 15 minutes talking about what new library services or resources we have.  This fall we talked to them about our LibGuide stats and with samples of course guides to show them, most responded very favorably to the concept. We discovered that when we described, their initial response was that they feared we were helping students cheat on assignments. With samples to show and say Professor so and so had us show their students this, that response changed. We were able to add 12 course specific guides this fall 2016 semester.  Each of these were paired with a visit to the class or library for an introduction.

So not only are Steve and Jeanette promoting course-specific resources to reduce library anxiety, but they’re increasing usage of library resources and their instruction sessions output to boot!

What is the biggest hurdle you face and how is LibGuides helping?

Newman University is located in Wichita, Kansas and most students come from the local area high schools, which do not have librarians.

Students have not met or seen a library since middle school or even elementary school in some cases. They have no idea what we do, what we have to offer them, and how to even make use of the library resources. We have found the LibGuides have helped bridge that gap to certain extent.

Any interesting comments or responses from your users to share?

Faculty Comments:

  • “This is amazing!  Thank you, thank you, thank you. I am genuinely excited!” –Paralegal Studies professor regarding course LibGuide.
  • “This looks FANTASTIC Jeanette!  Thank you so much for putting this together.  I look forward to your class visit on Thursday!”—Criminal Justice professor regarding course LibGuide
  • “This is awesome!  I really like the characteristics of an academic, peer-reviewed article, and the list of things needed in their citations is perfect.  Thanks again for all of your work on this.”  –Biology professor regarding course LibGuide
  • “Thank you for doing this! It looks good to me and I think it will help students… I don’t know if it’s possible to overemphasize learning and finding “controlled language” in searches.” –English professor regarding course LibGuide

Student Feedback:

  • “I’m finding the resources you have made available in LibGuides and databases much more comprehensive and user friendly than my graduate school. You should be so proud of your work.  You have truly made a difference for us, and I appreciate everything you continue to do for me.” –Nursing student (alum)

What’s next for the Dugan Library?

Even though they’ve just started, Jeanette and Steve have some great advice for new users.

I would highly encourage librarians who are just getting started to create templates for different guide types, makes building new guides so much easier and consistent with your overall plan.

Overall, Jeanette and Steve are really pleased with their LibGuides and the results they’ve seen thus far.

October 2016 SpringyCamp Recordings – Now Live!

SpringyCamp October 2016Another year, another memorable and spectacular SpringyCamp. A huge THANK YOU to all of our amazing presenters and attendees who participated – thanks for making this one of our best SpringyCamps yet!

Recordings of our three-day SpringyCamp are now online! Check out the presentations you missed, download presenter slides and recommended websites and readings, and relive the experience. S’mores are required, friendships bracelets are optional. 😉

Recordings

Day One: Academic Library Track

Presentations include:

Day Two: Academic Library Track

Presentations include:

Day Three: Focus On Your Community

Presentations include:

NCSU’s Makerspace Program Wins SLA’s Springshare Innovation Award

The winner of the 2016 Springshare Innovation Award is North Carolina State University Libraries’ Makerspace Program at the D.H. Hill Library!

The Academic Division of the Special Library Association (SLA) offers a Springshare Innovation in Libraries Award. Springshare donates this award which “recognizes a new program or service that demonstrates an innovative approach to academic librarianship”.(1)

Makerspace Lab at D.H. LibraryNCSU’s Makerspace Program is doing incredible work with 3D design and printing, 3D scanning, wearable electronics, programming with Arduinio & Rasberry Pi, and milling with CNC machines.

What’s more, they’re targeting women in the STEM fields with their ongoing “Making Spaces” event series. This series, in collaboration with NC State’s Women in Science and Engineering Village, College of Textiles faculty, and the College of Engineering’s Women in Engineering Program, aims to raise awareness among women about access to tools and technology while lowering the barrier for access and use of the Makerspace Labs.

And lastly, they’re working hard to integrate their Makerspace program into the curriculum of disciplines that aren’t normally associated with technology. For example, Ph.D. students in a Communications, Rhetoric, and Digital Media class titled “Technologies and Pedagogies in the Communication Arts” were tasked with designing and building technologies that would measure their students’ attention.

The SLA award committee acknowledged how the entire community at NC State has responded to the D.H. Library’s strong web presence, proactive training sessions, and outreach with their Makerspace program integration into the diverse curricula.

Congratulations to Adam Rogers, David Woodbury, Lauren DiMonte, and the NCSU Libraries for winning the SLA Academic Division Springshare Award for Innovation for their incredible work and outreach with their revolutionary Makerspace program!

Adam Rogers

Adam Rogers

David Woodbury

David Woodbury

Lauren DiMonte

Lauren DiMonte

  1. Congratulations to Our 2016 Awards Winners! | SLA Academic Division., 15 June 2016. Web. 01 July 2016, http://academic.sla.org/annual-conference/congratulations-to-our-2016-awards-winners.html.

New LibGuides Community Site

Hello Springyverse! We are pumped to announce that we have a brand new LibGuides Community site! 🙂

We’ve completely rethought the Community site and are thrilled with the results. Guide Search, Institution Search, Librarian Search, and introducing….Springy Picks! Let’s take this one-at-a-time, shall we?

Find Guides allows you to search v2 guides (get inspired!), and the results page has facets on guide type, subjects, tags, and library type for filtering. Find Institutions helps you find other like-minded-Springyverse-LibGuides-customers, including limiting by library type and location. Browse the beautiful site screenshots or switch to table view! Find Librarians connects you with other Librarians using LibGuides – think of the collaborations & new friendships you can cultivate!

Last, but certainly not least, is Springy Picks: sites and guides that we think are great, for one reason or another. Browse all sites or guides (there’s a tab for each), or limit by subjects: sites we thought were cool because of Springy Integrations or Visual Design, or guides that are on an Interesting Topic or are there for Fun & Shenanigans (we <3 fun & shenanigans! 😉 ).

Please note: Seeing a site or guide listed in this area does not constitute permission to copy anything…you’ll need to contact the site / guide author for that! It simply means we like what they did.

A screenshot slideshow is below for your perusal…we’re sure it’ll make you want to go to the site and try it out for yourself!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It’s Hot In Orlando – Time To Get Flashy

…with our presentations, of course! </wink>

Springshare’s heading to the ALA Annual Conference in Orlando, from June 24 – 27 and we’ve got an action-packed schedule of flash presentations, free giveaways, coloring time, and more. Plus, you won’t want to miss seeing how your colleagues use Springshare tools. While it might be hot outside, it will be even hotter at Booth 562.

Flash Presentations

All weekend long, we’re doing 15-min flash presentations on brand-new tools, coming updates, and more. If you attend a flash presentation, you can enter to win a *free* Kindle Fire!!

Guest Presentations

We have an amazing lineup of 14 guest presenters doing 11 separate flash presentations. They’re showing how they use Springshare tools to provide extraordinary service.

Friday, June 24: View Entire Day’s Schedule

Jeremy Hall

University of North Florida: Using LibGuides CMS to Power Our Website

5:45pm – 6:00pm

The University of North Florida uses a suite of Springshare tools to maintain their library website and services! Guest presenter Jeremy Hall, Virtual Services Librarian, will discuss how they’re using Springy Tools to provide thousands of students with access to their mobile-first library tools and services.

 


Saturday, June 25: View Entire Day’s Schedule

Moffitt Cancer Center: Creating a Virtual Nursing Journal Club

9:30am – 9:45am

Lauren Adkins will present on how the Moffitt Cancer Center uses LibGuides to setup an asynchronous online journal club to support evidence-based nursing topics and CE credit.

 

 

David Gliddon

Colorado Technical University: Using LibGuides to Manage the CTU Learning Center

12:00pm – 12:15pm

Dr. David Gliddon will provide examples of the different ways that CTU faculty members and administrators use LibGuides as a means to host articles, videos, academic resources, lectures, experiential activities, and interactive discussion.

 

 

Doug Furiato

Tampa Bay Library Consortium: Using LibAnswers for Statewide Ask a Librarian Services

1:00pm – 1:15pm

TBLC is the Florida statewide Ask a Librarian service, with over 130 Academic, School, Special, and Public Libraries participating. In early 2015, they switched to LibAnswers to provide consortial-level Ask-a-Librarian email/chat/sms reference. TBLC’er Doug Furiato will discuss their use of LibAnswers, share some eye-opening stats, and more.

 

Melissa Del Castillo

alvin dantesFlorida International University:
Using Netflix’s Visual Scrolling Style in LibAnswers

2:30pm – 2:45pm

By combining analytics and a simplified design, FIU libraries’ public facing LibAnswers platform was able to better meet the needs of our patrons. Melissa and Alvin will discuss how the design is a nod to sites like Netflix that are visually focused and intuitive.

 

Ashley Creek

University of Saint Mary: Using LibGuides to Train Student Workers

3:00pm – 3:15pm

Training student workers is repetitive, time-consuming, and covers significantly repetitious material. To provide a baseline student worker training orientation, presenter Ashley Creek constructed online interactive tutorials with embedded photos, videos, and capstone quizzes using Springshare’s LibGuides 2.0, Google Forms, & Flubaroo.

 

suzanne moore

Ashe County Library: Using LibGuides to Promote 2016 Reading Challenge

3:30pm – 3:45pm

Suzanne Moore will present on how they’re using LibGuides v.2 to show off their regional movie collection in a “Netflix” sort of browsing way and are currently designing a readers advisory tool to consolidate “all things bookish.” The 2016 Reading Challenge has been very successful as an interactive LibGuide by encouraging readers to share comments, about books they discover, as they meet each challenge in a Google form.


 

Sunday, June 26: View Entire Day’s Schedule

Latanya Jenkins

Temple University: Using LibGuides to Promote Black History Month

11:30am – 11:45am

Latanya Jenkins will present on how the Temple University Library collaborates with other departments to promote Black History Month across the campus. Using sample scans from the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American collection and books covers and resources from Temple University Library, Latanya will discuss how these integrated resources help to promote collection use.

 

Rhonda Kitchens

State College of Florida: Connecting with Distance Learners Using LibWizard

1:00pm – 1:15pm

Librarian Rhonda Kitchens understands the need to connect, engage, and instruct distance education students. Using LibWizard, Rhonda will showcase how the SCF Library will create self-paced interactive tutorials, online learning modules, gradable assessments/quizzes, and more.

 

 

Callan Bignoli

Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners: Celebrating 125 Years

1:30pm – 1:45pm

In 2015, the MBLC – the oldest state library agency in the country – celebrated its 125th anniversary! Presenter Callan Bignoli will discuss how the MBLC made a “microsite” using LibGuides CMS v2 to look back on those 125 years and put our accomplishments in historical context. Combined with a social media campaign to highlight one year per day, LibGuides gave them a great platform for creating beautiful, easily customizable, responsive web content to share with library & history fans.

 

Barbara Doll

Saint Francis University: Providing Staff Learning Opportunities Using LibGuides

2:30pm – 2:45pm

Librarian Barbara Doll will present on how their using LibGuides to provide a comprehensive staff learning program called “Give Yourself An Hour”. With the support of library administration, “if you give yourself an hour”, has resulted in staff members directing their own learning while focusing on core competencies. New content is added to the LibGuide each semester. To top it off, new staff have resources available to them to quickly come up to speed with library operations.


 

Monday, June 27: View Entire Day’s Schedule

jeffery mortimore

Ruth BakerGeorgia Southern University: Managing Content Across LibGuides & LibAnswers

10:30am – 10:45am

Ruth and Jeffrey will offer simple strategies for content creation and management that maximize opportunities for repurposing content across delivery platforms while keeping maintenance to a minimum.

Train Future Librarians and Request a *Free* Suite of Springshare Tools

Graduating Librarians, Information Professionals, and School Media Specialists are entering a workplace that requires more and more specialized skills, knowledge, and experience. Things like:

  • Experience at building a LibGuide;
  • Knowledge of administering & maintaining a LibGuides system;
  • Skill in using virtual chat reference tools like LibChat;
  • Know-how with coordinating, managing, and advertising library events;
  • Expertise in building and creating interactive instructional tutorials.

At Springshare, we recognize that Librarians-in-Training are the future <cue cheesy music> of Librarianship and we want to help them be as prepared as possible for what’s to come!

To that end, we’re offering a free Suite of Springshare Tools to any and all LIS Programs, School Media Specialist certification programs, or M.Ed Programs, and others. If you’re not sure your school or program qualifies, just fill out the form below and inquire!

With your LIS Suite, students will gain real-world experience using Springshare Tools. Furthermore, it can serve as a living and online archive of their student work – invaluable to future employers.

What’s in the LIS Suite of Springshare Tools?

Each LIS Suite comes with the following Springshare tools and you’re welcome to choose one, a few, or all of the tools to utilize within your program. You don’t need to get the entire Suite if you don’t need it! But, we think you might like to make use of all the tools in your proverbial toolkit!

LibGuides LogoLibGuides CMS:  Students learn to curate knowledge and build multimedia-rich guides by:

  • Creating subject, course, or topical Guides
  • Creating a mock ‘Library Website’
  • Learning about Bootstrap in a user-friendly environment
  • Creating a mock ‘Staff Policies & Procedures’ manual

LibWizard Logo​LibWizard: Students learn to create interactive tutorials, quizzes, surveys, and forms to engage patrons by:

  • Building self-paced interactive tutorials and assessments
  • Assessing patron learning with quizzes
  • Creating engaging feedback surveys
  • Replacing paper forms with mobile-friendly online forms

LibAnswers LogoLibAnswers Platform: Students develop their virtual reference and reference interview skills by:

  • Practicing a live chat exchange using LibChat
  • Creating media-rich FAQs and learning best practices for keyword optimization
  • Practicing their reference interview via email, SMS, Twitter, and more

LibCal LogoLibCal: Students learn how to create engaging library programming and events, manage space bookings, and create their own one-on-one consultation scheduler by:

  • Practicing creating a library calendar with engaging events
  • Communicating and advertising events to patrons
  • Managing library spaces, study rooms, and bookable spaces
  • Creating their own schedule for librarian consultations and advertising them to patrons

Terms of Use – All the Fun Without the Jargon

  1. Your LIS Suite of Springshare Tools may only be used within your library school, educational, or certification program to train future librarians and information professionals on the use of Springy Tools.
  2. You / your designated group of local admins are front-line support for any questions your students or faculty have about using Springshare tools. They / you can have full access to our help documentation and training, but all support questions from students/faculty are routed through you. Basically, you know them better than we do so it makes sense for their questions to be answered locally!
    • If you / your designated group of local admins have questions or need to report any issues, contact Springshare Support.
You may not use Springy Tools to provide services to patrons or end-users.

What About Content on Other LIS Systems?

Since 2011, we’ve realized the importance in providing access to LibGuides for Librarians-in-Training. If you’ve created content on these systems, we’ve outlined your options below.

Request Your LIS Suite of Springshare Tools!

Ready to get started? Request your LIS Suite of Tools today!

 

Beyoncé’s Lemonade – The LibGuide Heard Round the (twitter)World

Lemonade LibGuide Screenshot

Lemonade LibGuide:       http://libguides.mica.edu/lemonade

On April 28th at 9:09am, Jenny Ferretti, the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the Maryland Institute College of Art, tweeted that she had published a LibGuide on Beyoncé’s Lemonade visual album. The response, especially on Twitter, was astounding. In just 24hrs, Jenny’s LibGuide had over 14,000 views and her tweet has been retweeted and liked over 200+ times. The NYPL even got in on the buzz and tweeted Jenny’s LibGuide to their over 1.5Million followers. School Library Journal interviewed Jenny and wrote a blog post on the importance of building a LibGuide that unpacks the research behind the album. Providing much needed context so that users can make connections to and find references within the work

When we reached out Jenny to collaborate on a blog post, the first thing we discussed was, “What do we want to talk about that hasn’t already been said?“. What can we add to the conversation? Jenny, not surprisingly, had some great ideas about why she chose LibGuides, the overwhelming community feedback, and inclusion with instruction programs.

Why did you use LibGuides to create your Lemonade research portal?

I’m a fan of topical LibGuides, particularly those focused on recent events and popular culture. I’m a self-identified first generation American Latina. I have a fine art undergraduate background and I’m interested in various styles of fashion, music, television, and film. My background and interests help shape what I’m interested in discussing with Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) students as the Digital Initiatives Librarian at Decker Library. I approach media and art from the perspective of an information professional. So when Beyoncé’s visual album Lemonade was released, I wanted to unpack the hour-long film using resources from publications and popular websites.

I chose LibGuides as the platform to explore Lemonade because it’s a convenient tool that supports items in your library’s catalog or Worldcat, images, and gifs (which is pretty important when referencing Beyoncé). If you know the basics of how to make a LibGuide, you could make a guide right now. I have experience creating topical LibGuides after making “Understanding Civic Unrest in Baltimore, 1968-2015.” My personal research interest in Baltimore’s Civil Rights Era helped me understand that what happened in 2015 was not an isolated incident, but would our patrons know this? I wanted to create a space that had information about the history of civic unrest, community groups, and art.

When developing the Lemonade guide, I tried to accomplish a few different things. I wanted to compile articles and resources about Lemonade in one place. Articles analyzing and sharing information like all of the musical collaborators started showing up in feeds and timelines fairly soon after the visual album was released. I immediately wanted to categorize them and place them somewhere for others to find. For example, a recent addition is the #LemonadeSyllabus compiled by Candice Benbow through online suggestions.

Beyoncé samples three lines from a Malcolm X speech in the Anger chapter of the visual album. I wanted to hear the entire speech for context. I found that speech on YouTube and added it to the guide. Similarly, the Forgiveness chapter of the visual album includes three women holding photographs of their sons. Although I recognized the photos these women held as black men killed by police, I wondered if others had recognized them, or more importantly, knew their names. I sought out context and more information about the things I saw and heard in Lemonade.

Another goal of the guide was to share what is happening in the job market. If you stuck around the for the credits of the visual album, you would have seen seven directors names and seven cinematographers. Other credits, like poetry by Warsan Shire, styling, score and other music, choreography, production design, and more were also included. We can’t be Beyoncé, but we can unpack what it took to make something like Lemonade. I’d like our students to imagine working on something like the visual album if that’s what they’d like to do. It’s not a fantastical out-of-reach dream. Like many large-scale creative and artistic projects, it took a team of people to create Lemonade. For art and design students, it’s important to see who played what role.

The applications, beyond the LibGuide, are extensive. What are your thoughts on using it during library instruction?

Before Lemonade was released, I spoke with Siân Evans, Instruction Librarian at MICA, about Beyoncé’s performance at Super Bowl 50 and her Formation music video. We were both fascinated by creative choices like the nod to the Black Panther Party and the criticism Beyoncé received and controversy over copyright. In seeking to make research more exciting to undergraduate art students while also promoting critical thinking skills, Siân developed an instruction session which included a visual analysis of Formation, a discussion of Black Lives Matter, and an active learning component in which the students responded to the Super Bowl performance by researching the Black Panther Party in the library catalog, research databases, and special collections.

I sat-in on that instruction session and it occurred to me that our students might be more familiar with Beyoncé rather than the history of the Black Panthers. Engaging students through a popular point of reference is a great starting point for education. The Lemonade LibGuide includes a mix of printed books, publications, and work from popular websites. It can be used to demonstrate differences between primary, secondary, and peer-reviewed sources, as well as copyright, Creative Commons, and more.

Tell us about the response and feedback you’re getting from librarians, researchers, and activists around the world.


The feedback has been overwhelming in the best possible way. Within 24 hours the guide was viewed 17,000 times and has been viewed over 40,000 times to date. Two weeks after first publishing the guide, the shares and mentions on Twitter have started to slow down. Most of the positive feedback has been from those who work in libraries and archives. It has been shared on Twitter, tumblr, and Facebook by people like Sherrilyn Ifill, President & Director of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, institutions like New York Public Library, and publications like Library Journal and School Library Journal. It has it’s own hashtag: #libeyrianship.

Honestly, a lot of the comments I’m receiving are about how this LibGuide in particular is different from other LibGuides. Many people have commented that they didn’t think of LibGuides as a space for topical exploration. Hashtags like #woke, and comments that include the word “relevancy” and overall gratitude for my having created the guide usually follow retweets and shares. A lot of people want Queen Bey herself to acknowledge the LibGuide. Funny story: the night I published it and realized the impact of the guide online, I got a phone call from an unknown number with a New York City area code. For a second I thought to myself, “Bey???” but it was just my graduate school asking for a donation. 🙂

Many librarians have told me that they’ve either talked about it in instruction meetings or have intentions of copying the LibGuide. At least one library has copied the guide completely and adapted it to fit the needs of their students (with my permission and credit of course). LibGuides have always seemed like a resource for not only library patrons, but library professionals. I search for LibGuides on particular programs to get an idea of what someone else thought was an important resource or topic to mention.

My next step as far as using LibGuides goes is to develop a LibGuide Bootstrap Bootcamp with my colleagues at Decker Library. Once I realized LibGuides is based in the Bootstrap framework (after excellent support from Springshare), I realized LibGuides could be customized if you gave a few hours of your time to learning this code.

Decker Library (@deckerlibrary) will be hosting a Twitter chat about the LibGuide and instruction on Wednesday, June 8 at 2pm EST.
Follow along using #libeyrianship and @deckerlibrary
Official Announcement Coming Soon!

New Hanover County Public Library’s Knowledge Base in the Cloud

Rachel Langlois at the New Hanover County Public Library had a problem, she needed to create a cloud-based and mobile-friendly staff Knowledge Base. This Knowledge Base, replacing their paper manuals, needed to be flexible enough to be accessible by staffers anywhere and at anytime, but also secure enough so that patrons couldn’t gain access.

The New Hanover Public Library is a power Springy user, with subscriptions to LibGuides CMS, LibAnswers, LibCal, and LibInsight (not publicly accessible). So rather than turning to another tool or creating a VPN, Rachel thought to make use of the tools already at her fingertips! She created a Restricted/Password-Protected LibGuides CMS Group.

For a little background, with LibGuides CMS Groups you can create internal/restricted groups and guides assigned to those groups are automatically protected and not visible on the public side. It’s ideal for creating a cloud-based staff intranet, policy manual, or in Rachel’s case – a roving Knowledge Base. You can learn more about using LibGuides CMS to create a staff intranet here.

Only staffers at NHCPL with the password can access the Knowledge Base. So, it’s easy for them to call it up whenever and where ever they need it, from home or even while they’re roving the stacks – but with the safety and security of password protection.

And better yet, Rachel’s being green and saving effort to boot. If policies change, she only needs to update the Knowledge Base without having to reprint an entire new paper manual.

So kudos to Rachel for thinking inside the (LibGuides) box, and using LibGuides CMS to address this need! In fact, the Knowledge Base is now a standard section of on-boarding for all new NHCPL staffers.

Got 3min? Rachel even made a video so you can check out their Knowledge Base for yourself!
Note: The password in the video is no longer the password for the Knowledge Base. Strong security procedures for the win!

New Hanover County Public Library Knowledge Base Video Screenshot

Video opens in a new window.